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I want my $2.00!!

I’ve been trying to get the Marriott rewards people to credit me for my stay in Indianapolis since August. I’ve faxed their “missing stays” line the information three times and talked to two different people. One was a fairly capable-sounding chick who was thoroughly confused since my name was attached to some room that seemed like it was booked and paid “through an agency” or something. I can only think this is because my room reservation was part of a block reserved for Gen Con exhibitos but that’s never kept me from getting my points before.

I can show that my name, address, and credit card were on the reservation (the Indy Marriott faxed me a copy of the bill showing *I* paid for my own room in my own name), I even sent a copy of my electronic banking records (with the other transactions blacked out) for the time period that shows the transaction clearing my account. They even credited me with points for eating in the Indy hotel restaurant during my stay… I have those points but not for the stay itself! It seems so stupid and simple to fix from my end.

After talking to a woman who swore “anyone” could help me once they got that information from me, I faxed, waited a week and called back. The next woman I talked to was definitely no genius. She started insisting they’d credited me for my stay… the stay she was referring to was the stay from *2006*! Then she looked at my recent credit from the Springhill Suites (where I rented two rooms for 4 nights for our summit) and talking about how it was “double posted” as if the two rooms were a mistake and she was going to “fix” that for me! Ai! NO!

I’ve been hoarding my Marriott points for years and barely keeping my “Silver Elite” status alive now that we’re not traveling as much. If I don’t get this Indianapolis thing sorted I’ll be two stays short for keeping my status next year. In the big (or even small) picture this is nothing but for some reason it’s been really bugging me and I haven’t been able to let it go. I feel like that kid from Better Off Dead: “I want my $2!!”

20 comments to I want my $2.00!!

  • What I find most frustrating about those situations is that there is almost no recourse for me as a consumer… especially if it’s a good or service that I don’t purchase very often. I mean, if the world were structured such that I would get paid my hourly rate for the time I go through trying to sort such things out (say, with a free 10-minute “grace period” for the company I’m interacting with), then I’d be a lot more accepting: “No, I don’t mind waiting on hold… you’re paying for it!” (I once spent two hours on hold at GenCon with AT&T trying to get my local service from my old phone number disconnected.)

    Having computer problems? No concern to the company; you probably only buy one every five years or so, and the odds are good that practically no one at the company will be the same when you go back (and the company will probably have been sold a couple times in the interim). Having issues with an airline or hotel? Well, you probably went with whoever was cheapest anyway, so there’s no sense in preserving that loyalty. Troubles with your local phone company? Well, you probably only have one choice, so deal with it or go without.

    Perhaps with the rise of the Internet and the blogosphere the balance will begin tipping the other way, since it’s easier to warn a group of friends or a sphere of influence than before. But I’m skeptical.

    • That’s why I’ve been so relentless on tracking down my rewards points for this particular situation: I’ve shown my “loyalty” by booking with Marriott even when they haven’t been the very lowest rate and the particular stay I’m on about cost me over $1000! This wasn’t some bargain basement weekend away where I paid $200 and expect the world.

  • What I find most frustrating about those situations is that there is almost no recourse for me as a consumer… especially if it’s a good or service that I don’t purchase very often. I mean, if the world were structured such that I would get paid my hourly rate for the time I go through trying to sort such things out (say, with a free 10-minute “grace period” for the company I’m interacting with), then I’d be a lot more accepting: “No, I don’t mind waiting on hold… you’re paying for it!” (I once spent two hours on hold at GenCon with AT&T trying to get my local service from my old phone number disconnected.)

    Having computer problems? No concern to the company; you probably only buy one every five years or so, and the odds are good that practically no one at the company will be the same when you go back (and the company will probably have been sold a couple times in the interim). Having issues with an airline or hotel? Well, you probably went with whoever was cheapest anyway, so there’s no sense in preserving that loyalty. Troubles with your local phone company? Well, you probably only have one choice, so deal with it or go without.

    Perhaps with the rise of the Internet and the blogosphere the balance will begin tipping the other way, since it’s easier to warn a group of friends or a sphere of influence than before. But I’m skeptical.

    • That’s why I’ve been so relentless on tracking down my rewards points for this particular situation: I’ve shown my “loyalty” by booking with Marriott even when they haven’t been the very lowest rate and the particular stay I’m on about cost me over $1000! This wasn’t some bargain basement weekend away where I paid $200 and expect the world.

    • That’s why I’ve been so relentless on tracking down my rewards points for this particular situation: I’ve shown my “loyalty” by booking with Marriott even when they haven’t been the very lowest rate and the particular stay I’m on about cost me over $1000! This wasn’t some bargain basement weekend away where I paid $200 and expect the world.

  • What I find most frustrating about those situations is that there is almost no recourse for me as a consumer… especially if it’s a good or service that I don’t purchase very often. I mean, if the world were structured such that I would get paid my hourly rate for the time I go through trying to sort such things out (say, with a free 10-minute “grace period” for the company I’m interacting with), then I’d be a lot more accepting: “No, I don’t mind waiting on hold… you’re paying for it!” (I once spent two hours on hold at GenCon with AT&T trying to get my local service from my old phone number disconnected.)

    Having computer problems? No concern to the company; you probably only buy one every five years or so, and the odds are good that practically no one at the company will be the same when you go back (and the company will probably have been sold a couple times in the interim). Having issues with an airline or hotel? Well, you probably went with whoever was cheapest anyway, so there’s no sense in preserving that loyalty. Troubles with your local phone company? Well, you probably only have one choice, so deal with it or go without.

    Perhaps with the rise of the Internet and the blogosphere the balance will begin tipping the other way, since it’s easier to warn a group of friends or a sphere of influence than before. But I’m skeptical.

  • What I find most frustrating about those situations is that there is almost no recourse for me as a consumer… especially if it’s a good or service that I don’t purchase very often. I mean, if the world were structured such that I would get paid my hourly rate for the time I go through trying to sort such things out (say, with a free 10-minute “grace period” for the company I’m interacting with), then I’d be a lot more accepting: “No, I don’t mind waiting on hold… you’re paying for it!” (I once spent two hours on hold at GenCon with AT&T trying to get my local service from my old phone number disconnected.)

    Having computer problems? No concern to the company; you probably only buy one every five years or so, and the odds are good that practically no one at the company will be the same when you go back (and the company will probably have been sold a couple times in the interim). Having issues with an airline or hotel? Well, you probably went with whoever was cheapest anyway, so there’s no sense in preserving that loyalty. Troubles with your local phone company? Well, you probably only have one choice, so deal with it or go without.

    Perhaps with the rise of the Internet and the blogosphere the balance will begin tipping the other way, since it’s easier to warn a group of friends or a sphere of influence than before. But I’m skeptical.

    • That’s why I’ve been so relentless on tracking down my rewards points for this particular situation: I’ve shown my “loyalty” by booking with Marriott even when they haven’t been the very lowest rate and the particular stay I’m on about cost me over $1000! This wasn’t some bargain basement weekend away where I paid $200 and expect the world.

  • What I find most frustrating about those situations is that there is almost no recourse for me as a consumer… especially if it’s a good or service that I don’t purchase very often. I mean, if the world were structured such that I would get paid my hourly rate for the time I go through trying to sort such things out (say, with a free 10-minute “grace period” for the company I’m interacting with), then I’d be a lot more accepting: “No, I don’t mind waiting on hold… you’re paying for it!” (I once spent two hours on hold at GenCon with AT&T trying to get my local service from my old phone number disconnected.)

    Having computer problems? No concern to the company; you probably only buy one every five years or so, and the odds are good that practically no one at the company will be the same when you go back (and the company will probably have been sold a couple times in the interim). Having issues with an airline or hotel? Well, you probably went with whoever was cheapest anyway, so there’s no sense in preserving that loyalty. Troubles with your local phone company? Well, you probably only have one choice, so deal with it or go without.

    Perhaps with the rise of the Internet and the blogosphere the balance will begin tipping the other way, since it’s easier to warn a group of friends or a sphere of influence than before. But I’m skeptical.

  • My issue with the Rewards program is that you don’t seem to get a lot for your points. I have around 24k. I want to use mine for Gen con next year — any tips on stretching them in Indianapolis?

    • Yeah, generally rewards points don’t give you a lot. Sometimes, though, after a LOT of saving there’s a free ticket or an upgrade to first class or something that you can squeeze out of it.

      I found out I wasn’t “optimizing” my points, which was very ungamer of me. Like, I didn’t know that I could get points for eating in the hotel restaurant, which I end up doing (whether I want to or not) at least a couple of times each convention. Or converting partner points from car rentals or flights on unusual carriers to hotel points. There are some ways to maximize on the point thing that can help get more out of your various visits.

  • My issue with the Rewards program is that you don’t seem to get a lot for your points. I have around 24k. I want to use mine for Gen con next year — any tips on stretching them in Indianapolis?

    • Yeah, generally rewards points don’t give you a lot. Sometimes, though, after a LOT of saving there’s a free ticket or an upgrade to first class or something that you can squeeze out of it.

      I found out I wasn’t “optimizing” my points, which was very ungamer of me. Like, I didn’t know that I could get points for eating in the hotel restaurant, which I end up doing (whether I want to or not) at least a couple of times each convention. Or converting partner points from car rentals or flights on unusual carriers to hotel points. There are some ways to maximize on the point thing that can help get more out of your various visits.

    • Yeah, generally rewards points don’t give you a lot. Sometimes, though, after a LOT of saving there’s a free ticket or an upgrade to first class or something that you can squeeze out of it.

      I found out I wasn’t “optimizing” my points, which was very ungamer of me. Like, I didn’t know that I could get points for eating in the hotel restaurant, which I end up doing (whether I want to or not) at least a couple of times each convention. Or converting partner points from car rentals or flights on unusual carriers to hotel points. There are some ways to maximize on the point thing that can help get more out of your various visits.

  • My issue with the Rewards program is that you don’t seem to get a lot for your points. I have around 24k. I want to use mine for Gen con next year — any tips on stretching them in Indianapolis?

  • My issue with the Rewards program is that you don’t seem to get a lot for your points. I have around 24k. I want to use mine for Gen con next year — any tips on stretching them in Indianapolis?

    • Yeah, generally rewards points don’t give you a lot. Sometimes, though, after a LOT of saving there’s a free ticket or an upgrade to first class or something that you can squeeze out of it.

      I found out I wasn’t “optimizing” my points, which was very ungamer of me. Like, I didn’t know that I could get points for eating in the hotel restaurant, which I end up doing (whether I want to or not) at least a couple of times each convention. Or converting partner points from car rentals or flights on unusual carriers to hotel points. There are some ways to maximize on the point thing that can help get more out of your various visits.

  • My issue with the Rewards program is that you don’t seem to get a lot for your points. I have around 24k. I want to use mine for Gen con next year — any tips on stretching them in Indianapolis?

  • That’s why I’ve been so relentless on tracking down my rewards points for this particular situation: I’ve shown my “loyalty” by booking with Marriott even when they haven’t been the very lowest rate and the particular stay I’m on about cost me over $1000! This wasn’t some bargain basement weekend away where I paid $200 and expect the world.

  • Yeah, generally rewards points don’t give you a lot. Sometimes, though, after a LOT of saving there’s a free ticket or an upgrade to first class or something that you can squeeze out of it.

    I found out I wasn’t “optimizing” my points, which was very ungamer of me. Like, I didn’t know that I could get points for eating in the hotel restaurant, which I end up doing (whether I want to or not) at least a couple of times each convention. Or converting partner points from car rentals or flights on unusual carriers to hotel points. There are some ways to maximize on the point thing that can help get more out of your various visits.