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Obama Landslide

Obama Flag

This victory alone is not the change we seek. It is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were.
It can’t happen without you, without a new spirit of service, a new spirit of sacrifice.

So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism, of responsibility, where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves but each other.

So. Obama has challenged us. The American people cannot just vote and call it good. We need to "summon a new spirit of service, a new spirit of sacrifice…a new spirit of patriotism, of responsibility."

What is your service? What is your sacrifice? What are you going to let your sense of patriotism serve? What are you going to be responsible for?

24 comments to Obama Landslide

  • Early Supporter

    You were an early supporter of the next President of the United States. Congratulations to you.

    I am happy that he struck this note (that you quoted) in his victory speech – this is the beginning, not the end. And, you are right to ask each of us what we are going to do.

    In his email thanking supporters last night (early this morning?), he said, “We have a lot of work to do to get our country back on track, and I’ll be in touch soon about what comes next.” I expect that he is going to use those millions of supporters make change in America.

  • Early Supporter

    You were an early supporter of the next President of the United States. Congratulations to you.

    I am happy that he struck this note (that you quoted) in his victory speech – this is the beginning, not the end. And, you are right to ask each of us what we are going to do.

    In his email thanking supporters last night (early this morning?), he said, “We have a lot of work to do to get our country back on track, and I’ll be in touch soon about what comes next.” I expect that he is going to use those millions of supporters make change in America.

  • Early Supporter

    You were an early supporter of the next President of the United States. Congratulations to you.

    I am happy that he struck this note (that you quoted) in his victory speech – this is the beginning, not the end. And, you are right to ask each of us what we are going to do.

    In his email thanking supporters last night (early this morning?), he said, “We have a lot of work to do to get our country back on track, and I’ll be in touch soon about what comes next.” I expect that he is going to use those millions of supporters make change in America.

  • Early Supporter

    You were an early supporter of the next President of the United States. Congratulations to you.

    I am happy that he struck this note (that you quoted) in his victory speech – this is the beginning, not the end. And, you are right to ask each of us what we are going to do.

    In his email thanking supporters last night (early this morning?), he said, “We have a lot of work to do to get our country back on track, and I’ll be in touch soon about what comes next.” I expect that he is going to use those millions of supporters make change in America.

  • I’ve made my service and sacrifice before in serving in our country’s military. It’s appropriate that when I do so again, I’ll be doing so for our communities. I’ve long promised myself that I would volunteer with Habitat for Humanity when I had some reliable income (read: gas money) — because of where I live, I can’t without it — and I mean to uphold that promise whether I can begin tomorrow or within the next year.

  • I’ve made my service and sacrifice before in serving in our country’s military. It’s appropriate that when I do so again, I’ll be doing so for our communities. I’ve long promised myself that I would volunteer with Habitat for Humanity when I had some reliable income (read: gas money) — because of where I live, I can’t without it — and I mean to uphold that promise whether I can begin tomorrow or within the next year.

  • I’ve made my service and sacrifice before in serving in our country’s military. It’s appropriate that when I do so again, I’ll be doing so for our communities. I’ve long promised myself that I would volunteer with Habitat for Humanity when I had some reliable income (read: gas money) — because of where I live, I can’t without it — and I mean to uphold that promise whether I can begin tomorrow or within the next year.

  • I’ve made my service and sacrifice before in serving in our country’s military. It’s appropriate that when I do so again, I’ll be doing so for our communities. I’ve long promised myself that I would volunteer with Habitat for Humanity when I had some reliable income (read: gas money) — because of where I live, I can’t without it — and I mean to uphold that promise whether I can begin tomorrow or within the next year.

  • What will I do? What I have always done. I will go out there and try to make the world a better place. I will continue to promote a better understanding of the world around us and our place in it. I will press for recycling and alternative energy sources. I will smile at people I meet and offer a friendly greeting, even if they spit in my face. Things do not change simply because we have a new President.

    • What will I do? What I have always done.

      I believe it’s going to take more than that to move past the challenges we face going forward. That’s not meant to disparage the positive we may already be doing… but I do think we’re all going to be asked to do more, to make do with less, and I believe that coming up with a tangible goal makes measuring our success and eventually achieving that goal easier.

      For example, I made a commitment to sponsor a child who was rescued from a brothel in the Philippines over the next two years. For Christmas this year, I’m giving through Heiffer International. I am challenging myself in 2009 to increase my family’s reliance on the abundance of local and seasonal foods we’re so fortunate to have access to and to reduce our consumption of pre-packaged, processed, far-traveled foods by 50% or more.

      Even if your “service” is something like “I’m going to donate blood at least once this year” I believe even those small extras will make a difference, we just have to express the specific intention in order to follow through.

  • What will I do? What I have always done. I will go out there and try to make the world a better place. I will continue to promote a better understanding of the world around us and our place in it. I will press for recycling and alternative energy sources. I will smile at people I meet and offer a friendly greeting, even if they spit in my face. Things do not change simply because we have a new President.

    • What will I do? What I have always done.

      I believe it’s going to take more than that to move past the challenges we face going forward. That’s not meant to disparage the positive we may already be doing… but I do think we’re all going to be asked to do more, to make do with less, and I believe that coming up with a tangible goal makes measuring our success and eventually achieving that goal easier.

      For example, I made a commitment to sponsor a child who was rescued from a brothel in the Philippines over the next two years. For Christmas this year, I’m giving through Heiffer International. I am challenging myself in 2009 to increase my family’s reliance on the abundance of local and seasonal foods we’re so fortunate to have access to and to reduce our consumption of pre-packaged, processed, far-traveled foods by 50% or more.

      Even if your “service” is something like “I’m going to donate blood at least once this year” I believe even those small extras will make a difference, we just have to express the specific intention in order to follow through.

    • What will I do? What I have always done.

      I believe it’s going to take more than that to move past the challenges we face going forward. That’s not meant to disparage the positive we may already be doing… but I do think we’re all going to be asked to do more, to make do with less, and I believe that coming up with a tangible goal makes measuring our success and eventually achieving that goal easier.

      For example, I made a commitment to sponsor a child who was rescued from a brothel in the Philippines over the next two years. For Christmas this year, I’m giving through Heiffer International. I am challenging myself in 2009 to increase my family’s reliance on the abundance of local and seasonal foods we’re so fortunate to have access to and to reduce our consumption of pre-packaged, processed, far-traveled foods by 50% or more.

      Even if your “service” is something like “I’m going to donate blood at least once this year” I believe even those small extras will make a difference, we just have to express the specific intention in order to follow through.

  • What will I do? What I have always done. I will go out there and try to make the world a better place. I will continue to promote a better understanding of the world around us and our place in it. I will press for recycling and alternative energy sources. I will smile at people I meet and offer a friendly greeting, even if they spit in my face. Things do not change simply because we have a new President.

  • What will I do? What I have always done. I will go out there and try to make the world a better place. I will continue to promote a better understanding of the world around us and our place in it. I will press for recycling and alternative energy sources. I will smile at people I meet and offer a friendly greeting, even if they spit in my face. Things do not change simply because we have a new President.

    • What will I do? What I have always done.

      I believe it’s going to take more than that to move past the challenges we face going forward. That’s not meant to disparage the positive we may already be doing… but I do think we’re all going to be asked to do more, to make do with less, and I believe that coming up with a tangible goal makes measuring our success and eventually achieving that goal easier.

      For example, I made a commitment to sponsor a child who was rescued from a brothel in the Philippines over the next two years. For Christmas this year, I’m giving through Heiffer International. I am challenging myself in 2009 to increase my family’s reliance on the abundance of local and seasonal foods we’re so fortunate to have access to and to reduce our consumption of pre-packaged, processed, far-traveled foods by 50% or more.

      Even if your “service” is something like “I’m going to donate blood at least once this year” I believe even those small extras will make a difference, we just have to express the specific intention in order to follow through.

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure that Obama’s victory can really be classified as a landslide. There’s a bit of range in between a narrow win and blowing your competition away, and this election seems to have been right in the middle of that range so I’d classify it as being a clear victory.

    Here are some historical examples of landslides:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1936
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1964
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1972
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1984

    I only bring this up because Obama should have won in a landslide that looked a lot like the 1964 election. McCain was the weakest presidential candidate to be nominated by a major party during my lifetime and it’s just incredible that he had 46.2% of the vote and took 21 states. It’s great that he did win with enough of a margin that it can’t be questioned, but there’s still something seriously wrong here.

    Sam

    • Fair enough, I guess. In electoral college terms (love or hate the electoral college, it’s how elections are decided) I considered Obama getting over double the electoral votes of McCain to be worthy of “landslide”. The elections you linked to are more in the “blowout” territory for me. :)

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure that Obama’s victory can really be classified as a landslide. There’s a bit of range in between a narrow win and blowing your competition away, and this election seems to have been right in the middle of that range so I’d classify it as being a clear victory.

    Here are some historical examples of landslides:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1936
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1964
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1972
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1984

    I only bring this up because Obama should have won in a landslide that looked a lot like the 1964 election. McCain was the weakest presidential candidate to be nominated by a major party during my lifetime and it’s just incredible that he had 46.2% of the vote and took 21 states. It’s great that he did win with enough of a margin that it can’t be questioned, but there’s still something seriously wrong here.

    Sam

    • Fair enough, I guess. In electoral college terms (love or hate the electoral college, it’s how elections are decided) I considered Obama getting over double the electoral votes of McCain to be worthy of “landslide”. The elections you linked to are more in the “blowout” territory for me. :)

    • Fair enough, I guess. In electoral college terms (love or hate the electoral college, it’s how elections are decided) I considered Obama getting over double the electoral votes of McCain to be worthy of “landslide”. The elections you linked to are more in the “blowout” territory for me. :)

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure that Obama’s victory can really be classified as a landslide. There’s a bit of range in between a narrow win and blowing your competition away, and this election seems to have been right in the middle of that range so I’d classify it as being a clear victory.

    Here are some historical examples of landslides:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1936
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1964
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1972
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1984

    I only bring this up because Obama should have won in a landslide that looked a lot like the 1964 election. McCain was the weakest presidential candidate to be nominated by a major party during my lifetime and it’s just incredible that he had 46.2% of the vote and took 21 states. It’s great that he did win with enough of a margin that it can’t be questioned, but there’s still something seriously wrong here.

    Sam

  • Anonymous

    I’m not sure that Obama’s victory can really be classified as a landslide. There’s a bit of range in between a narrow win and blowing your competition away, and this election seems to have been right in the middle of that range so I’d classify it as being a clear victory.

    Here are some historical examples of landslides:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1936
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1964
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1972
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._presidential_election,_1984

    I only bring this up because Obama should have won in a landslide that looked a lot like the 1964 election. McCain was the weakest presidential candidate to be nominated by a major party during my lifetime and it’s just incredible that he had 46.2% of the vote and took 21 states. It’s great that he did win with enough of a margin that it can’t be questioned, but there’s still something seriously wrong here.

    Sam

    • Fair enough, I guess. In electoral college terms (love or hate the electoral college, it’s how elections are decided) I considered Obama getting over double the electoral votes of McCain to be worthy of “landslide”. The elections you linked to are more in the “blowout” territory for me. :)