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The news has broken

I can officially stop being cryptic.

155 comments to The news has broken

  • I suppose this means that the Advanced Guide to Food, Punk Rock, and Gossip is going to be systemless, then?

  • Any idea if there would be an allowance for companies to purchase more binders?

    Other than that, which is a shitty fix, all I can say is, “Man. I–okay then…” and then hurriedly walk away, shaking my head.

  • Geez, that sounds more annoying than the 3.5 stuff. At least publishers could copy it for duly NDA’d freelancers.

  • Yeah, I’d agree with that. 3rd Edition and D20 had good enough buzz that I was willing to pick it up at launch…and I was a 2nd edition hater! :D

    With 4e, they keep teasing us with tiny amounts of information, but hardly enough to make informed decisions, which is why I think a lot of the player base is sitting on the fences. Selling $15 teaser books filled with vague details is not a marketing plan. :) There definitely seems to be a consistent plan of nickle and diming publishers and players for the ‘D&D experience’, which just leaves me more likely to go with the “3 core books and out” plan.

  • My smartass reply when they started to go on about cost and manpower to produce more kits was “Well, that’s what our $5,000 is for, right?”

  • I’m also concerned that a majority of small publishers will wait the extra 5 months or so, then rush their products like mad to get onto the gravy choo-choo. As a result, there would be even more of glut of crappy 4e third-party products than we saw for 3.X, which would ultimately hurt all publishers.

    • I’m not sure I agree with this concern. Here’s why: the OGL goes free this summer and it will be a good six months before those would-be publishers can release their products. During that time, the rules will be actually, really final (unlike the state they’re in now, where WotC admits that they expect they’ll be “tweaked” right up to mid- to late-March). WotC’s core books will have been out for half a year and the first third-party (open content) books almost as long. During that time, people opting for the free license will have the chance to judge the marketplace (Does 4E launch big or is it a flop? Are people excited to switch? How have the products released by the “early adopters” who paid to play been received?).

      All of that is *way* more information that those who are buying in early have. The Phase Two companies will have had just as long (if not slightly longer) to learn the new rules before their on sale date opens up, plus all the benefits of any errata that’s discovered and content/experiences from other publishers to draw on. In theory, this staggered plan could actually result in *better* releases come January 09. It’s vastly superior to the plan that would have allowed the users of the free license to sell product starting September 1. June to September is not enough time to learn rules, put together quality products and get it on shelves! The September 1 open date would have virtually guaranteed the “flood of crap” that happened with early D20 and that many people fear for 4E.

      There’ll still be junk hitting the market either way but I vastly prefer this schedule to the one that was proposed during yesterday’s conference call.

  • I’m also concerned that a majority of small publishers will wait the extra 5 months or so, then rush their products like mad to get onto the gravy choo-choo. As a result, there would be even more of glut of crappy 4e third-party products than we saw for 3.X, which would ultimately hurt all publishers.

    • I’m not sure I agree with this concern. Here’s why: the OGL goes free this summer and it will be a good six months before those would-be publishers can release their products. During that time, the rules will be actually, really final (unlike the state they’re in now, where WotC admits that they expect they’ll be “tweaked” right up to mid- to late-March). WotC’s core books will have been out for half a year and the first third-party (open content) books almost as long. During that time, people opting for the free license will have the chance to judge the marketplace (Does 4E launch big or is it a flop? Are people excited to switch? How have the products released by the “early adopters” who paid to play been received?).

      All of that is *way* more information that those who are buying in early have. The Phase Two companies will have had just as long (if not slightly longer) to learn the new rules before their on sale date opens up, plus all the benefits of any errata that’s discovered and content/experiences from other publishers to draw on. In theory, this staggered plan could actually result in *better* releases come January 09. It’s vastly superior to the plan that would have allowed the users of the free license to sell product starting September 1. June to September is not enough time to learn rules, put together quality products and get it on shelves! The September 1 open date would have virtually guaranteed the “flood of crap” that happened with early D20 and that many people fear for 4E.

      There’ll still be junk hitting the market either way but I vastly prefer this schedule to the one that was proposed during yesterday’s conference call.

    • I’m not sure I agree with this concern. Here’s why: the OGL goes free this summer and it will be a good six months before those would-be publishers can release their products. During that time, the rules will be actually, really final (unlike the state they’re in now, where WotC admits that they expect they’ll be “tweaked” right up to mid- to late-March). WotC’s core books will have been out for half a year and the first third-party (open content) books almost as long. During that time, people opting for the free license will have the chance to judge the marketplace (Does 4E launch big or is it a flop? Are people excited to switch? How have the products released by the “early adopters” who paid to play been received?).

      All of that is *way* more information that those who are buying in early have. The Phase Two companies will have had just as long (if not slightly longer) to learn the new rules before their on sale date opens up, plus all the benefits of any errata that’s discovered and content/experiences from other publishers to draw on. In theory, this staggered plan could actually result in *better* releases come January 09. It’s vastly superior to the plan that would have allowed the users of the free license to sell product starting September 1. June to September is not enough time to learn rules, put together quality products and get it on shelves! The September 1 open date would have virtually guaranteed the “flood of crap” that happened with early D20 and that many people fear for 4E.

      There’ll still be junk hitting the market either way but I vastly prefer this schedule to the one that was proposed during yesterday’s conference call.

  • I’m also concerned that a majority of small publishers will wait the extra 5 months or so, then rush their products like mad to get onto the gravy choo-choo. As a result, there would be even more of glut of crappy 4e third-party products than we saw for 3.X, which would ultimately hurt all publishers.

  • I’m also concerned that a majority of small publishers will wait the extra 5 months or so, then rush their products like mad to get onto the gravy choo-choo. As a result, there would be even more of glut of crappy 4e third-party products than we saw for 3.X, which would ultimately hurt all publishers.

    • I’m not sure I agree with this concern. Here’s why: the OGL goes free this summer and it will be a good six months before those would-be publishers can release their products. During that time, the rules will be actually, really final (unlike the state they’re in now, where WotC admits that they expect they’ll be “tweaked” right up to mid- to late-March). WotC’s core books will have been out for half a year and the first third-party (open content) books almost as long. During that time, people opting for the free license will have the chance to judge the marketplace (Does 4E launch big or is it a flop? Are people excited to switch? How have the products released by the “early adopters” who paid to play been received?).

      All of that is *way* more information that those who are buying in early have. The Phase Two companies will have had just as long (if not slightly longer) to learn the new rules before their on sale date opens up, plus all the benefits of any errata that’s discovered and content/experiences from other publishers to draw on. In theory, this staggered plan could actually result in *better* releases come January 09. It’s vastly superior to the plan that would have allowed the users of the free license to sell product starting September 1. June to September is not enough time to learn rules, put together quality products and get it on shelves! The September 1 open date would have virtually guaranteed the “flood of crap” that happened with early D20 and that many people fear for 4E.

      There’ll still be junk hitting the market either way but I vastly prefer this schedule to the one that was proposed during yesterday’s conference call.

  • I’m also concerned that a majority of small publishers will wait the extra 5 months or so, then rush their products like mad to get onto the gravy choo-choo. As a result, there would be even more of glut of crappy 4e third-party products than we saw for 3.X, which would ultimately hurt all publishers.

  • I’m not sure I agree with this concern. Here’s why: the OGL goes free this summer and it will be a good six months before those would-be publishers can release their products. During that time, the rules will be actually, really final (unlike the state they’re in now, where WotC admits that they expect they’ll be “tweaked” right up to mid- to late-March). WotC’s core books will have been out for half a year and the first third-party (open content) books almost as long. During that time, people opting for the free license will have the chance to judge the marketplace (Does 4E launch big or is it a flop? Are people excited to switch? How have the products released by the “early adopters” who paid to play been received?).

    All of that is *way* more information that those who are buying in early have. The Phase Two companies will have had just as long (if not slightly longer) to learn the new rules before their on sale date opens up, plus all the benefits of any errata that’s discovered and content/experiences from other publishers to draw on. In theory, this staggered plan could actually result in *better* releases come January 09. It’s vastly superior to the plan that would have allowed the users of the free license to sell product starting September 1. June to September is not enough time to learn rules, put together quality products and get it on shelves! The September 1 open date would have virtually guaranteed the “flood of crap” that happened with early D20 and that many people fear for 4E.

    There’ll still be junk hitting the market either way but I vastly prefer this schedule to the one that was proposed during yesterday’s conference call.

  • Hell, Kinko’s will do the entire print job for them, down to putting it in binders; all they have to do is drop off the files and come back later.

  • They specified that the binders would be printed on copy-proof paper with special IDing watermark stuff. They think they’re George Lucas all of a sudden. ;) Pretty sure that’s why they balk a bit at additional copies.